History of Sturgeon Lake First Nation, cited in Sturgeon Lake First Nation Inquiry – Red Deer Holding Agricultural Lease, 1998, 10, ICCP.

This research document cites that the members of Sturgeon Lake First Nation are descended from Cree Chief Ah-yah-tus-kum-ik-im-am and his four headmen (Oo-sahn-us-koo-nee-kik, Yay-yah-too-way, Loo-sou-am-ee-kwakn, and Nees-way-yak-ee-nah-koos) who signed Treaty Six near Fort Carlton on August 23, 1876 (p. 8). According to the Department of Indian Affairs records, the Band was first listed as William Twatt Band, in reference to the Chief’s English name, then in 1963 changed to the Sturgeon Lake Band, and now is known as the Sturgeon Lake First Nation. On, May 17th, 1878 through Order in Council, a 34.4 square mile of reserve land was surveyed about 25 miles northwest of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, on behalf of this First Nation.

The research document notes that in 1994, the Sturgeon Lake First Nation submitted a specific claim to the Minister of Indian Affairs, as this related to the concern of a failed lease of reserve land to Red Deer Holdings Ltd. (RDH) in 1982 (p. 3). Specifically, Sturgeon Lake First Nation cited that the Crown had breached its lawful obligations with respect to the administration of its reserve land by:

failing to do a background check to determine what authority the principle had within RDH and what the financial position of the company was;
failing to obtain a personal guarantee from the principal of RDH; and failing to have the agricultural permit signed by RDH (page 14).

On August 28, 1997, Michel Roy, Director General of the Specific Claims Branch, wrote to Chief Ermine accepting the claim for negotiation under the fast track process (p. 18).

History of Sturgeon Lake First Nation, cited in Sturgeon Lake First Nation Inquiry – Red Deer Holding Agricultural Lease, 1998, 10, ICCP.

Author(s): Ron S. Maurice / Kathleen N. Lickers
Publisher: Indian Claims Commission, 1998.
Location: Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, U of R, Northern Campus, P.A. Sask.

This research document cites that the members of Sturgeon Lake First Nation are descended from Cree Chief Ah-yah-tus-kum-ik-im-am and his four headmen (Oo-sahn-us-koo-nee-kik, Yay-yah-too-way, Loo-sou-am-ee-kwakn, and Nees-way-yak-ee-nah-koos) who signed Treaty Six near Fort Carlton on August 23, 1876 (p. 8). According to the Department of Indian Affairs records, the Band was first listed as William Twatt Band, in reference to the Chief’s English name, then in 1963 changed to the Sturgeon Lake Band, and now is known as the Sturgeon Lake First Nation. On, May 17th, 1878 through Order in Council, a 34.4 square mile of reserve land was surveyed about 25 miles northwest of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, on behalf of this First Nation.

The research document notes that in 1994, the Sturgeon Lake First Nation submitted a specific claim to the Minister of Indian Affairs, as this related to the concern of a failed lease of reserve land to Red Deer Holdings Ltd. (RDH) in 1982 (p. 3). Specifically, Sturgeon Lake First Nation cited that the Crown had breached its lawful obligations with respect to the administration of its reserve land by:

failing to do a background check to determine what authority the principle had within RDH and what the financial position of the company was;
failing to obtain a personal guarantee from the principal of RDH; and failing to have the agricultural permit signed by RDH (page 14).

On August 28, 1997, Michel Roy, Director General of the Specific Claims Branch, wrote to Chief Ermine accepting the claim for negotiation under the fast track process (p. 18).