Forestry, Sturgeon Lake First Nation; i.e. Planting Training, 1997.

As noted by the author of this article, the above-mentioned project was initiated in May 1997 and completed in 1998. Thus, the article is reprinted here in the format that it was published on the website of the Canadian Forest Service.

As per the above-mentioned, the following cites the reprinted article, noting the comments provided by Michael Newman:

Project Description: Annual reforestation projects by Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. and the Government of Saskatchewan in traditional hunting and gathering areas presented opportunities for a Sturgeon Lake reforestation crew. This required training planters and a foreman. The crew functioned as a private contractor.

The training program was located in the south-central area of Sturgeon Lake Reserve No. #101. The land was prepared for reforestation after a recent fire burned over the area.  There were 55 hectares of prepared land available for the program. There were 110,600 seedlings purchased. The band’s contribution was the administration and overall management of the project and a financial contribution of $2000 towards the seedling purchase.

An inventory of written documentation on the Woodland Cree First Nations of PAGC

The inventory of written documentation on the Woodland Cree First Nations of PAGC is cited as follows: the name of the Woodland Cree First Nation, followed by the title of each written documentation and the year it was published/recorded, the name of the author, and the location as to where this written documentation could be accessed. In addition, a brief description of the content with regard to the written documentation is provided.

The history of the Sturgeon Lake First Nation, which until the 1940s was named the William Twatt Band, the Indian chief from 1876-1882 spokesperson of the tribe – his Cree name was ‘Osawaskonikik’.  William Twatt was a the son of Magnus Twatt who, like so many Orcadians, left Orkney’s shores to work for the Hudson’s Bay Company, in 1771.

On 23 August, 1876, seven Cree chiefs signed chiefs signed away 121,000 square miles in exchange for one square mile of reserve land for each family, under Treaty Six between representatives of the British Crown and the Cree and Saulteaux nations at Fort Pitt and Fort Carlton, Saskatchewan, Canada.  Only one chief was native. The rest were grandsons of Scotsmen – with surnames like Spence, Tait, Macdonald, Twatt and Calder.

Forestry, Sturgeon Lake First Nation; i.e. Planting Training, 1997.

Author(s): Michael Newman
Publisher: Canadian Forest Service, 1998.
Location: Canadian Forest Service, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

As noted by the author of this article, the above-mentioned project was initiated in May 1997 and completed in 1998. Thus, the article is reprinted here in the format that it was published on the website of the Canadian Forest Service.

As per the above-mentioned, the following cites the reprinted article, noting the comments provided by Michael Newman:

Project Description: Annual reforestation projects by Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. and the Government of Saskatchewan in traditional hunting and gathering areas presented opportunities for a Sturgeon Lake reforestation crew. This required training planters and a foreman. The crew functioned as a private contractor.

The training program was located in the south-central area of Sturgeon Lake Reserve No. #101. The land was prepared for reforestation after a recent fire burned over the area.  There were 55 hectares of prepared land available for the program. There were 110,600 seedlings purchased. The band’s contribution was the administration and overall management of the project and a financial contribution of $2000 towards the seedling purchase.

An inventory of written documentation on the Woodland Cree First Nations of PAGC

The inventory of written documentation on the Woodland Cree First Nations of PAGC is cited as follows: the name of the Woodland Cree First Nation, followed by the title of each written documentation and the year it was published/recorded, the name of the author, and the location as to where this written documentation could be accessed. In addition, a brief description of the content with regard to the written documentation is provided.

The history of the Sturgeon Lake First Nation, which until the 1940s was named the William Twatt Band, the Indian chief from 1876-1882 spokesperson of the tribe – his Cree name was ‘Osawaskonikik’.  William Twatt was a the son of Magnus Twatt who, like so many Orcadians, left Orkney’s shores to work for the Hudson’s Bay Company, in 1771.

On 23 August, 1876, seven Cree chiefs signed chiefs signed away 121,000 square miles in exchange for one square mile of reserve land for each family, under Treaty Six between representatives of the British Crown and the Cree and Saulteaux nations at Fort Pitt and Fort Carlton, Saskatchewan, Canada.  Only one chief was native. The rest were grandsons of Scotsmen – with surnames like Spence, Tait, Macdonald, Twatt and Calder.