Forestry, Sturgeon Lake First Nation; i.e. Eco-Tourism Site Development, 1999.

As noted by the author of this article, the above-mentioned project was initiated in May 1999 and completed as of 2000. Thus, the article is reprinted here in the format that it was published on the web site of Canadian Forest Service.

As per the above-mentioned, the following cites the reprinted article, noting the comments provided by Michael Newman:

Project Description: The Sturgeon Lake First Nation’s project is a combined project consisting of the development of a hiking trail following the old, traditional trail along Sturgeon Lake. Along with this is the creation of an open air cooking site surrounded by picnic tables – both of which are designed to attract eco-tourism, while at the same time located near and used by the Youth Healing Center, where Elders instruct up to 60 youth in their native tongue, about the forest and animals around them.

A trail was cut through the bush from the main road down to the lake. This took a long time because the bush was cut by hand, salvaging the trees for home use. The cut timber was bucked into eight-foot lengths for easier handling. A bulldozer cleared stumps and started shaping the roadway. Gravel and clay was hauled for the road.

A building was purchased and moved to the site. Washroom facilities, marina dock, storage sheds and a concession patio were built. Power and telephone lines were run down to the site. Signs, buildings and guardrail posts were painted. Canoes, boats and motors are available to rent. Unemployed band members were given jobs for this project.

The Western Canada Summer Games chose the site as the paddling site in July 1999.  This event was very successful and provided a good setting for participants and spectators. The facility and area will be used in the coming years.


Forestry, Sturgeon Lake First Nation; i.e. Eco-Tourism Site Development, 1999.

The following two (2) articles cite the involvement of the Sturgeon Lake First Nation in the area of forestry.

Author(s): Michael Newman
Publisher: Canadian Forest Service, 2000.
Location: Canadian Forest Service, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

As noted by the author of this article, the above-mentioned project was initiated in May 1999 and completed as of 2000. Thus, the article is reprinted here in the format that it was published on the web site of Canadian Forest Service.

As per the above-mentioned, the following cites the reprinted article, noting the comments provided by Michael Newman:

Project Description: The Sturgeon Lake First Nation’s project is a combined project consisting of the development of a hiking trail following the old, traditional trail along Sturgeon Lake. Along with this is the creation of an open air cooking site surrounded by picnic tables – both of which are designed to attract eco-tourism, while at the same time located near and used by the Youth Healing Center, where Elders instruct up to 60 youth in their native tongue, about the forest and animals around them.

A trail was cut through the bush from the main road down to the lake. This took a long time because the bush was cut by hand, salvaging the trees for home use. The cut timber was bucked into eight-foot lengths for easier handling. A bulldozer cleared stumps and started shaping the roadway. Gravel and clay was hauled for the road.

A building was purchased and moved to the site. Washroom facilities, marina dock, storage sheds and a concession patio were built. Power and telephone lines were run down to the site. Signs, buildings and guardrail posts were painted. Canoes, boats and motors are available to rent. Unemployed band members were given jobs for this project.

The Western Canada Summer Games chose the site as the paddling site in July 1999.  This event was very successful and provided a good setting for participants and spectators. The facility and area will be used in the coming years.